Anatomy of a photo #45: Wild rose with dewdrops


If you look closely you can still see some of the dewdrops on the petals of this Wild California Rose

Flowers are wonderful subjects for photography. In a short space and time they will go through many shapes and forms- the plant iitself, the bud, flowers, and the seed head or pod (or in the case of roses the hip).

They can often be found in the same place year after year and when you find an interesting one, you can watch it as it goes through all of its various forms. You know where to find it throughout the seasons and can do whole series of images throughout its the development and growth.

Also you can photograph flowers and plants from many different sides and angles since they are not a moving creature and will stay still as you decide where to shoot from- the side, or viewing down onto the petals, from above or down low. Just pay attention to where your light is coming from, and how you want to capture it.

This image is of a California Wild Rose and it’s just beginning to blossom. This picture was taken early in the morning- notice to the dewdrops still adorning its delicate petals. I used to a 70-200mm zoom lens to get in close and capture lots of detail.

The aperture I set wide open so that the background would be blurred out, and it would not be a confusion of shadows and lines distracting from the main image. This is one of my favorite ways to focus the viewers attention where I want it.

ISO was set to 100 for a minimum of noise, and the shutter speed was then set to give a proper exposure.

About Galen Leeds Photography

Nature and wildlife photographer, exploring the world on his feet and from his kayak. Among other genres, he is one of the leading kayak photographers in Northern California. To learn more about him, visit him on his website- www.galenleeds.net
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